Page 34 - SilverKris September 2014

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Street snacks
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PHOTO
JASPER YU
ART DIRECTION
ONDREJ PLUHAR, ADI EFFENDY
FOOD STYLING
CLARA LUBOFF
E S S E N T I A L S
how the world does it
Treats sold
by roadside
vendors give a
quick taste of
exotic cuisines
and cultures.
BY SIM EE WAUN
4
KHANOM
BUANG,THAILAND
It takes a practiced
hand to make these
crisp little pancakes
well. A batter of
sweet mung bean
and rice flour is
cooked on a hot
plate and layered
with egg white
meringue. The
pancakes are then
topped with either
sweetened duck
egg yolk or dried
shrimps, mixed with
shredded coconut
and folded. The
snack’s history can
be traced back 600
years. You can try
them at stalls in
Bangkok’s Tha Phra
Chan market on
Khao San Road.
3
PANI PURI,
INDIA
In cities likeMumbai
and Kolkata,
vendors sell crisp
puffed balls of
semolina and wheat
flour, deep fried to
a golden hue. They
are stuffed with
mashed potatoes,
chickpeas, onions
and peas, then
either dipped or
topped with mint
and tamarind.
Locals stand around
the street vendor
who serves pani
puri one by one until
they’ve had their fill.
Try them at Punjab
Sweet House (
Dhiraj
Arcade 84, Tel: 91
22 2640 2221
) in
Mumbai.
5
HOT DOGS,
USA
Cooked sausages – in
hotdog buns – laden
with toppings like
mustard, ketchup,
chilli con carne and
onions, may be
one of Amercia’s
biggest cultural
exports. But they
were introduced
to the country by
German immigrants
in the 19th century.
Regional variations
include Coney Island
dogs topped with a
spicy meat mixture,
and Kansas City hot
dogs with sauerkraut
andmelted cheese.
Chomp on a delicious
variety of hotdogs
at Crifdogs (
crifdogs.
com
) in NewYork.
1
SIGARABOREK,
TURKEY
These baked cigar-
shaped treats
comprise delicate
layers of phyllo
pastry that encase
fillings like feta
cheese, spinach or
minced meat. Back
in the early Ottoman
Empire, they were
served to royalty.
Today, people from
countries formerly
under the Ottomans
– fromNorth Africa
to the Balkans – still
snack on them, with
many boasting family
recipes. Get a taste
at Meshur Sariyer
Borekcisi (
Yeni
Mahalle Caddesi No.
50, Tel: 90 212 242
1539
) in Istanbul.
2
BUNNY CHOW,
SOUTHAFRICA
No rabbits are
used in this dish,
a hollowed out
quarter- or half-loaf
of bread filled with
vegetable or meat
curry. It was the food
of Indian labourers
who arrived in
Durban in the 19th
century. South
Africans called these
immigrants “banias”
– derived from a
term for the Indian
merchant class – and
the colloquialism
evolved into
“bunnies’’. Chow
on one at Patel’s
Vegetarian
Refreshment Room
(
202 Grey Street,
Tel: 27 31 306 1774
).
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